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Jeff Koplow

COVID-19
Advanced Materials
Building Technologies
Energy Conversion
Energy Storage
Solar
Fiber Optics
Adsorption
Analog Electronics
Automation
Capacitors
Coating Materials
Design for Manufacturability
Diffraction
Electric Motors
Electrochemistry
High-powered Lasers
High Temp Conditions
Instrumentation
Insulation
Lasing
Manufacturing Processes
Controls
Materials Characterization
Optics
Photocataysis
Power Electronics
Rare Earth Materials Technology
Rotary Electrical Contacts
Sealing Materials
Spectroscopy
Structural Materials
Thin Films
Diagnostics
Sensors

About

He received his bachelor's in chemistry from Reed College in 1990, and his doctorate in chemistry from Harvard University in 1996. He specializes in multi-disciplinary problem solving in the physical sciences and their corresponding engineering disciplines. Over his 22-year research and development (R&D) career, he has developed expertise in physical chemistry, chemical kinetics, atmospheric chemistry, instrumentation, electronics (digital, analog, power, and RF), spectroscopic sensing, lasers, fiber optics and wave guides, classical optics, electro-optics, electromagnetics, electromechanical systems, heat transfer, materials science, mechanical engineering, manufacturing processes, and renewable energy technologies. He has won four R&D 100 Awards, holds numerous patents, has 10 active licenses on his inventions, and given many invited talks on the subject of serial innovation. In 2015, he was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy as its Inaugural SunShot Innovator in Residence. He invented the Radical-Ion Flow Battery under the SunShot Innovator in Residence Program to address the need for low-cost, highly scalable electrochemical grid storage, and the performance limitations of prior art battery chemistries in this demanding application. His current research portfolio is focused on electrochemical grid storage, the elimination of rare-earth magnets in wind turbines, and semiconductor thermal management (power electronics, CPUs, GPUs).